Reconstruction of an Andean flat braid, braid and photo by Rodrick Owen

Rodrick Owen, and the Braids of the Mummies

New: Rodrick Owen will be teaching a two-day class on Peruvian flat braids at Braids 2016–July of next year! (Registration for the conference has just opened)
Buried textiles rarely survive even a few hundred years.
But in sites in and around what is now Peru, treasure troves of amazing textiles have been found that are thousands of years old—including beautiful and intricate loop braids!


Braids 2012, part 1

Loop braiding highlights at the conference: Two different 2-day loop braiding workshops, plus a report from Mari Omura on loop braiding archeological evidence in Asia going back thousands of years B.C! Joy Boutrup’s 1st day of class included several unusual European loop braids that she has discovered through analyzing museum specimens—braids that are not known from any of the 15th or 17th C. loop braiding manuscripts…

Kute-uchi braids, 16-36 loops

Genji-uchi, & new link

Just a note to say that I’ve added text instructions for the Genji-Uchi braid to last year’s Kute-Uchi tutorial. I also want to plug Cindy Myer’s pages on Medieval fingerloop braids — this is an incredible resource! She’s analyzed the braid instructions of 3 different source manuscripts, and made beautiful reproductions of almost all of them. These are displayed in a chart with links to her very clear text instructions for each braid…


Medieval 2-worker braid from a German cathedral

This is an incredible finger loop braid from the 14th Century! It’s only known from one actual artifact–a century older than the oldest of the surviving loop braiding manuscripts. The braid has a very peculiar and intricate structure. And is amazingly similar to a Japanese kute-uchi braid that was made by a completely different method…