Braids 2012, part 1

Loop braiding highlights at the conference: Two different 2-day loop braiding workshops, plus a report from Mari Omura on loop braiding archeological evidence in Asia going back thousands of years B.C! Joy Boutrup’s 1st day of class included several unusual European loop braids that she has discovered through analyzing museum specimens—braids that are not known from any of the 15th or 17th C. loop braiding manuscripts…

Kute-uchi braids, 16-36 loops

Genji-uchi, & new link

Just a note to say that I’ve added text instructions for the Genji-Uchi braid to last year’s Kute-Uchi tutorial. I also want to plug Cindy Myer’s pages on Medieval fingerloop braids — this is an incredible resource! She’s analyzed the braid instructions of 3 different source manuscripts, and made beautiful reproductions of almost all of them. These are displayed in a chart with links to her very clear text instructions for each braid…

Rainbow Girl

A ‘Plain Oblique Twined’ braid — usually abbreviated as POT by ply-split braiders. This kind of twining can also be done with loop braiding. I love this braid, and got to use it as part of a Braid Society Swap because of its unplanned resemblance to a Navajo sand painting figure… (not a tutorial)

Double braid workshop at Braids 2012

I am very excited about this! I just got word that my workshop proposal  (Intro to double braids as a solo braider) was accepted by the organizers of Braids 2012!  That’s an international braiding conference (who knew?) that will be held in Manchester, England next year,  August 20 – 24, put on by the Braid…

Tutorial: 9-loop braids

Basic intro to using your thumbs in loop braiding. Why let two whole digits go to waste? When I first was shown how to make a 5-loop square braid, the friend-of-a-friend who showed me mentioned nonchalantly that I could braid 7 and 9-loop braids the same way, just by adding more loops and fingers. Photo-tute and videos.

Medieval 2-worker braid from a German cathedral

This is an incredible finger loop braid from the 14th Century! It’s only known from one actual artifact–a century older than the oldest of the surviving loop braiding manuscripts. The braid has a very peculiar and intricate structure. And is amazingly similar to a Japanese kute-uchi braid that was made by a completely different method…